Abbreviations:

b. = born

bap. = baptised

c. = christened

c/m = marriage contract

d. = died

d. vita patris = died in the father's lifetime

dsp(decessit sine prole) died without issue

m. = married

COCKBURN

OF THAT ILK

 

  1. William Cockburn of that Ilk, (see below).
  2. Andrew Cockburn,
  3. Robert Cockburn, who, with his brother, Andrew, were witnesses and bailies to their brother William’s Sasine for the lands of Mayscheill in 1533.[1]

William Cockburn of that Ilk. There is a degree of speculation and confusion surrounding this person’s ancestry and it has become generally accepted that he was a younger son of Sir William Cockburn of Langton who was killed at Flodden in 1513. The origin of this assertion is the following passage which appears on Page 80 of “The Records of the Cockburn Family”:[2] “In 1527 William Cockburn purchased from David, Earl of Crawford, the lands of Cockburn, which had belonged to the Lindsays for two hundred years and more, and to the Dunbars before them. The earl's charter was dated 12th April, and three days later the King confirmed it.” That, however, is a misinterpretation of the charter in question which is not for the lands of Cockburn but is, instead for those of Inverarity, in the sheriffdom of Forfar, with Cockburn, in Berwickshire, being in warrandice. Further, in that same charter William Cockburn is then styled “de eodem” or “of that ilk” which proves that at the time of its execution, he was already in full possession of the lands of Cockburn as opposed to only then acquiring them. Nor does it constitute proof that William Cockburn of that Ilk was a younger son of William Cockburn of Langton, as beyond his wife, Isobel Hume, and their eldest son and apparent heir, Alexander Cockburn, it is silent on his relationship to any other person.

On 31 May 1532, he had a gift of the “nonentres, malis, fermes, proffittis and dewiteis” of the lands of Cockburn from the King for “all zeris and termes bigane that the samyn hes bene in our sorverane lordis handis, and his maist nobill predecessouris of gud mynd, quham God assolze, be resound of nonentres, sen the deces of umquhile Alexander Erle of Crauford, and siclike of all zeris and termes to cum.”[3]

He acquired further lands including those of Lochbirgeam, in the sheriffdom of Berwick, from Sir Alexander Kirkpatrick of Kirkmichael by charter of 30 July 1532[4] as well as those of Mayscheil, also in the sheriffdom of Berwick, from John, Prior of Pittenweem, for which he had Sasine on 25 July 1533,[5] and on 7 July 1542 a precept passed the Privy Seal for a charter of confirmation to him for the lands of Cockburn following alienation in his favour by David, Earl of Crawford. He m. Isabel Hume, who is conjunctly included with him in numerous documents, and was father of,

  1. Alexander Cockburn of that Ilk, (see below).
  2. John Cockburn,
  3. Peter Cockburn,
  4. William Cockburn,
  5. Phillip Cockburn,
  6. George Cockburn. All of whom are styled brothers to Alexander Cockburn of that Ilk when witnesses to his Testament in 1582. He also witnessed his sister-in-law, Helen Hepburn’s Testament in 1587.

Alexander Cockburn of that Ilk, who was included in a charter by David, Earl of Crawford, granting the barony of Inverarity, in Forfarshire, to himself and his parents on 12 April 1527.[6] He m. Helen, daughter of Patrick Hepburn of Waughton, (c/m 12 February 1541/42.[7] She survived him and d. on 12 August 1587[8]), and d. on 10 March 1582.[9] He was father of,

  1. William Cockburn of that Ilk, (see below).
  2. Alexander Cockburn, is named in his father’s Latter Will.
  3. Patrick Cockburn, is styled the youngest son in his mother’s Testament in 1587.
  4. Margaret Cockburn,
  5. Marion Cockburn, both of which daughters are named in their mother’s Testament in 1587.

William Cockburn of that Ilk, had a charter under the Great Seal for the lands of Lochbirgham alias Lochtoun, on 30 October 1574[10] and had in succeeded his father in his estate by 8 August 1583 when he was infeft in the lands of Mayscheill as heir to him.[11] He m. Margaret, daughter of John Renton of Billie, (c/m 1574[12]), and was father of,

  1. William Cockburn of that Ilk, (see below).
  2. John Cockburn
  3. James Cockburn,
  4. David Cockburn, all of whom are named in a caution by Sir George Home of Wedderburn on 6 November 1610, not to harm them.[13]

William Cockburn of that Ilk, succeeded his father and was served heir general to him on 27 May 1630,[14] then as heir to him in the lands of Mayscheil, in the constabulary of Haddington, on 20 January 1631.[15] He m. Elizabeth, daughter of John Kincaid of Warriston, and was father of,

  1. John Cockburn of that Ilk, (see below).
  2. Alexander Cockburn, who was complained of to the Privy Council by Gilbert Verte in Rigfutt, in 1634, for having “armed in a warlike manner, came furiously to him” and “after threatning him with death and other injureis if he laboured that land, the said Alexander Cockeburne, with a great baton he had in his hand, gave him a number of cruel and deadly wounds upon the head to the great effusion of his blood and peril of his life.”[16]

John Cockburn of that Ilk, m. Elspeth, daughter of Sir William Oliphant, 1st of Newton, (c/m 9 & 12 October 1626[17]), and in implementation of which they had a conjunct charter for the lands of Cockburn from his parents on 12 May 1627.[18] He succeeded his father and d. at Cockburn in 1652, his Testament being drawn up there by himself on 1 July of that year.[19] He was father of,

  1. William Cockburn of that Ilk, succeeded his father, to whom he was executor in 1652, and was served heir to him in the barony of Cockburn on 13 November 1656.[20] He dsp and was buried in the Greyfriars, Edinburgh, on 15 March 1663.[21]
  2. Sir James Cockburn, 1st Baronet of that Ilk, (see below).
  3. Thomas Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 24 September 1635 and was apprenticed to Patrick Nichol, Merchant in Edinburgh, on 23 February 1653.[22]
  4. Alexander Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 12 August 1641 and was apprenticed to Hew Wilson, Apothecary in Edinburgh, on 29 August 1660.[23]
  5. Archibald Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 14 September 1644.
  6. Elizabeth Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 17 January 1630.
  7. Margaret Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 18 February 1631.
  8. Nicholas Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 29 April 1633.
  9. Catherine Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 15 July 1634.
  10. Jean Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 27 July 1637.
  11. Anna Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 4 October 1638.
  12. Lilias Cockburn, bap. at Duns, on 25 May 1640.

Sir James Cockburn, 1st Baronet of that Ilk, bap. at Duns, on 7 November 1628 and being a second son, he was put to a trade and apprenticed to Patrick Nichol, Merchant in Edinburgh, on 22 September 1647.[24] He succeeded his brother, William, in 1663, and was created a Baronet on 24 May 1671, in reward for his services at the battle of Worcester.[25] He m. on 8 January 1658, to Grisel, daughter of Alexander Hay of Barra, d. on 1 January 1704[26] and was father of,

  1. Alexander Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 31 December 1658.
  2. Sir William Cockburn, 2nd Baronet, of that Ilk, (see below).
  3. James Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 2 September 1668.
  4. John Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 22 April 1675.[27]
  5. Barbara Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 22 July 1660.
  6. Agnes Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, 11 June 1664 and d. in infancy.
  7. Christine Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 11 May 1665.
  8. Grisel Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 3 April 1666 and d. in infancy.
  9. Agnes Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 21 June 1667.
  10. Grisel Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 24 September 1669.
  11. Elizabeth Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 25 February 1672 who assigned her share of a Bond granted by Sir Alexander Cockburn of Langton, to her brother, Sir William, on 31 January 1726.[28]
  12. Grisel Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 29 January 1674 and with her sisters, Isobel and Bethia, had a Bond from their brother, Sir William, on 7 April 1736.[29] She m. George Waddell, daughter of Dr. Richard Waddell, Archdeacon of St. Andrews, (c/m September 1734[30]).
  13. Isobel Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 21 July 1678.
  14. Bethia Cockburn, bap. at Edinburgh, on 12 August 1681 and had an annuity of £41 from her nephew, Sir James Cockburn, on 27 January 1753.[31]

Sir William Cockburn, 2nd Baronet of that Ilk, bap. at Edinburgh, on 11 September 1662 and was admitted a Member of the Faculty of Advocates in 1686 “which Office he exercifed with good Succefs and Approbation till the late Revolution, at which Time, his Confcience not allowing him to take the Oaths to the then Government, he retired from publick Bufinefs.”[32] He m. Helen, daughter of Mark Learmonth, Advocate, (c/m 12 July 1718.[33] She survived him and d. at Dalkeith, on 28 November 1754[34]), d. at Dalkeith, on 4 January 1751[35] and was father of,

  1. Sir James Cockburn, 3rd Baronet of that Ilk, (see below).
  2. Grizel Cockburn, m. Captain John Greenfield, (c/m 18 June 1747[36]).
  3. Isabella Cockburn, who disponed half a house with the cellar to her sister, Jane, on 24 December 1764.[37]
  4. Jane Cockburn, d. at Edinburgh, on 23 August 1789.[38]

Sir James Cockburn, 3rd Baronet of that Ilk, succeeded and was served heir to his cousin, Sir Alexander Cockburn of Langton, on 3 January 1749,[39] then to his father, Sir William Cockburn, and his grandfather, Sir James Cockburn, in the lands of Langton, Borthwick and Simprim, and the office of Usher of Scotland, on 25 November 1754,[40] which he disponed to David Gavin in 1757. He d. at Cork, on 13 March 1780, having m. firstly, at Edinburgh, on 8 April 1764, to Mary, daughter of Robert Rochead of Masterton,[41] (she d. at the Hot-Wells, Bath, on 6 September 1766[42]), and was father of,

  1. Sir William James Cockburn, 4th Baronet of that Ilk, succeeded his father and served as a Major in the 1st Battalion Royals. He d. unmarried, at Athlone, Ireland, on 22 January 1800.[43]

He m. secondly, in 1779, to Phoebe Sharman, (marriage licence dated in 1779[44]), by whom he had further issue;

  1. Sir James Cockburn, 5th Baronet of that Ilk, who is named in his mother’s and half brother’s Wills of 28 January 1798 and 9 January 1800 respectively, and succeeded that brother as Baronet on his death without issue in 1800. He m. at St Martin in the Fields, London, on 13 November 1824, to Barbara Spettigue[45] and d. at Lambeth, London, in 1841.[46]
  2. George Cockburn, who was a Surgeon at the Cape of Good Hope in 1798 and was an Ensign in the 3rd Guards in 1800. He d. at London, on 17 October 1800.[47]
  3. Robert James Cockburn, who is named in his mother and half-brother’s Wills and served as Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion Royals. He d. at Newry, Ireland, on 17 July 1800.[48]

 

____________________________

 

[1] NLS Laing Charters. No. 391.

[2] Sir Robert Cockburn, Bart, and Harry A. Cockburn , London & Edinburgh, 1913.

[3] PS1/9/146.

[4] C2/24/268.

[5] NLS Laing Charters. No. 391.

[6] C2/22/113.

[7] GD216/123.

[8] CC8/8/20/418.

[9] CC8/8/12/508.

[10] C2/34/186.

[11] NLS Laing Charters, No. 1066.

[12] GD216/124.

[13] Reg. Privy Council. Vol. 6. P. 262.

[14] C22/12/97.

[15] C22/11/233.

[16] Reg. Privy Council, Second Series, Vol. 5. PP. 262-263.

[17] C2/52/47.

[18] C2/52/47.

[19] CC15/5/4/197.

[20] C22/24/74.

[21] Greyfriars Burial register.

[22] SRS Register of Edinburgh Apprentices.

[23] SRS Register of Edinburgh Apprentices.

[24] SRS Register of Edinburgh Apprentices.

[25] GD216/260.

[26] Greyfriars Burial register.

[27] He is said to have settled in Ireland and to have had issue there who assumed the Baronetcy on the death without issue of Sir James Cockburn, 4th Baronet, in 1800. In doing so they disregarded the rights of succession of the male issue of the 3rd Baronet by his second wife, Phoebe Sharman, on the presumption that they were unmarried and, consequently, any issue would be unable to succeed on the grounds of illegitimacy. No evidence to prove the 3rd Baronet’s second marriage being forthcoming at the time nor until now, the succession was allowed and has been generally accepted, however, new research has located suitable evidence which is now cited and proves the right of succession of the 3rd Baronet’s issue by his second wife.

[28] GD216/80.

[29] GD216/83.

[30] GD216/152.

[31] GD216/115.

[32] Caledonian Mercury, 14th January 1751 edition.

[33] GD216/147.

[34] Caledonian Mercury, 28th November 1754 edition.

[35] Caledonian Mercury, 14th January 1751 edition.

[36] GD216/159.

[37] GD216/71.

[38] Scots Magazine, 1st August 1789 edition.

[39] Services of Heirs.

[40] Services of Heirs.

[41] OPR – Edinburgh.

[42] Bath Chronicle, 18th September 1766 edition.

[43] Aberdeen Press & Journal, 10th February 1800 edition.

[44] Public Record Office of Ireland, Marriage Licence Bonds: Diocese of Cork and Ross.

[45] OPR – St Martin in the Fields.

[46] Lambeth Burial Records.

[47] Scots Magazine, 1st November 1800 edition. He is then styled son of the late Lieutenant Colonel Sir James Cockburn, Bart.

[48] Aberdeen Press & Journal, 21st April 1800 edition.